Will firewood bring termites to my home?

Who doesn't love a nice roaring fire to keep warm and cozy this winter? You need to exercise caution however, as pyromania has dangers beyond the obvious.

 A roaring fire is loved by many during winter!  

A roaring fire is loved by many during winter!  

On a cold night, you don't want to have to travel far to grab some timber to top up your fire. The problem however, lies in the stored firewood. 

 A large pile of lumber is a comforting sight before winter.

A large pile of lumber is a comforting sight before winter.

Termites love timber, the more the better. A huge pile of lumber is about as attractive as it gets for a termite colony, once the termites detected a good food source, then they will communicate with other members of the colony to inform them of the smorgasboard they have discovered. 

This will not only bring in more members to feed on the timber that they have found, but termites are eternal foragers, too much is never enough, so they will continue to forage in the vicinity of the food source. Now imagine that this is happening right next to your home! 

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This wood pile had a few extra guests. With termites eating away at the timber in this wood pile.  

We recommend not having your firewood stored in ground contact, additionally, any timber that you keep near your home (you know, for easy access on a cold night!) needs to be stored up off the ground and definitely not abutting the house. 

Can I bring termites into my home if I inadvertently bring in a piece of timber with termites in it? 

The simple answer is no, aside from the fact that they will soon be fried! Subterranean termites are social creatures, as such they need to be in contact with the rest of the colony, a few termites, brought in by a lump of timber pose no threat to the home. 

Additionally, the termites need moisture to survive, a warm, dry house will ensure that they won't survive for any appreciable amount of time.  

In conclusion, we recommend that firewood be stored away from the home, in an elevated position away from ground contact. If you must store firewood sitting it on a continuous pour concrete slab with no joins will eliminate undetected termite entry as long as you can see clearly around the edge of the slab.  

 Timber stored in this shed with a concrete floor was still on the menu, but the signs were obvious.   

Timber stored in this shed with a concrete floor was still on the menu, but the signs were obvious.   

Sentricon Always Active - The Future of Baiting!

We are proud to be supplying a new termite bait product in Australia! Servicing the Central coast and Newcastle region with a revolutionary new way of killing termites.

Baiting is not only a way of eradicating a termite colony in a home, but can also be used to kill off colonies as they forage for food near a structure - thus providing protection. 

This can be particularly useful when a chemical barrier is not viable due to construction restrictions.  

See the video below to find out how the Sentricon Always active system works!

Sentricon AlwaysActive is the future of termite management; what homeowners have always thought a termite bait should be. But it's not a bait! Active from installation, Sentricon does not contain a bait but a revolutionary termiticide rod. Termite colonies may be eliminated before you ever know they exist!

 A Sentricon bait station being checked for activity.  

A Sentricon bait station being checked for activity.  

Contact us for a free quote or more information. Ph: 0474 962443

 

 Oodles of delicious sentricon stations ready for installation. The always active rods in the stations will protect the home from the moment we install them!

Oodles of delicious sentricon stations ready for installation. The always active rods in the stations will protect the home from the moment we install them!

 A Sentricon always active rod is eaten out within months of being installed. This highlights it's palatability. 

A Sentricon always active rod is eaten out within months of being installed. This highlights it's palatability. 

 A Sentricon rod completely eaten out not long after the system was installed.  

A Sentricon rod completely eaten out not long after the system was installed.  

Do termite barriers work?

There is often great discussion in the pest control industry about what products work and what products don't work, often the discussion is about termite barriers. 

The problem with making statements like " 'X' termite barrier doesn't work because I saw infestation 'Y' " is that the limitations and scope of the barrier are seldom included in the statement.

The reality is that, for the most part, termite barriers DO work, the problem usually occurs in the installation. 

Here are some prime examples of termite barriers that have been incorrectly installed. 

 A termite barrier is tucked underneath a bearer, allowing for undetected termite entry.  

A termite barrier is tucked underneath a bearer, allowing for undetected termite entry.  

 This barrier is hidden behind a pier, since it's not directly attached to the ant capping, termites could easily climb up behind the pier without being seen.  

This barrier is hidden behind a pier, since it's not directly attached to the ant capping, termites could easily climb up behind the pier without being seen.  

 Once again, the barrier does not make it all the way out to an inspection edge under the bearer.  

Once again, the barrier does not make it all the way out to an inspection edge under the bearer.  

Chemical Termite treatments after heavy rain and flooding.

Following the East Coast Low, heavy rainfall has battered a large portion of the East Coast of Australia. Many homes were flooded and a large portion of land was inundated with water, both moving and standing. Does this flooding and saturation affect chemical termite treatments?

A technical note from BASF regarding Termidor treatments can be found here.

"Inadequate" Ant Capping

Ant capping is barrier that prevents termites from being able to get into a building undetected, this is generally made of a strip of galvanised metal shielding. It's very purpose is not to stop termites completely, but to give them some sort of obstruction so that they have to build a mud shelter tube to go around. 

These can often be overlooked and forgotten about when renovations take place, repairs or changes are made to the existing building and sometimes can just rot away without anyone noticing.

 The ant capping metal shield with it's inspection edge being completely covered by a cover strip.

The ant capping metal shield with it's inspection edge being completely covered by a cover strip.

 This ant cap was not joined properly during construction, and to add to the potential problems, is clearly rusting away.

This ant cap was not joined properly during construction, and to add to the potential problems, is clearly rusting away.

 An addition to this property has resulted in the ant capping being compromised, you can clearly see that the ant cap does not completely cover the new vertical cover strip, causing an easy passage for termites to get in undetected.

An addition to this property has resulted in the ant capping being compromised, you can clearly see that the ant cap does not completely cover the new vertical cover strip, causing an easy passage for termites to get in undetected.

 Vertical Transitions such as this one, are a commonplace entry point for termites.

Vertical Transitions such as this one, are a commonplace entry point for termites.

 This photo clearly demonstrates a vertical transition where the ant capping is not joined, for the ant capping to be effective both the lower and upper sections of ant capping need to be joined in the middle to form a continuous barrier. In this particular case, it was virtually impossible to visually inspect between the two levels as there was poor access. That's why it's important to get it right during the construction phase.

This photo clearly demonstrates a vertical transition where the ant capping is not joined, for the ant capping to be effective both the lower and upper sections of ant capping need to be joined in the middle to form a continuous barrier. In this particular case, it was virtually impossible to visually inspect between the two levels as there was poor access. That's why it's important to get it right during the construction phase.