Reticulation - you're doing it wrong.

 Reticulation line installed in a cavity and on top of a slab.

Reticulation line installed in a cavity and on top of a slab.

 Remedial work to ensure that the home was protected after a reticulation system failure.

Remedial work to ensure that the home was protected after a reticulation system failure.

 Termite galleries showing how this reticulation system failed.

Termite galleries showing how this reticulation system failed.

These photos were taken after a client had a re-infestation and had to do more termite prevention work after another firm failed to install a reticulation system correctly.

This highlights something important for anyone considering paying good money for termite protection, make sure you are happy with what you are getting and understand how it works.

We often explain to our clients how termite prevention systems work and also inform them to do some research. You should be confident that the system will work and the company you are employing to care for your property knows what they are doing.

In this particular instance, the system failed because the reticulation system was installed so that it delivers the termiticide (chemical!) in the wall cavity and under some steps. Not only is this dangerous to the occupants of the house, but it could not prevent the termites getting in.

Modern chemical termite treated zones are designed to be installed in soil, not concrete, and as such the reticulation system pictured here could not deliver the chemical to the soil to create a treated zone and prevent the termites getting in. The client paid good money for this system and was continually paying for regular services.

Don't be shy to ask questions and ask what you're getting for your money!